Thursday, October 2, 2014




The Place of Humiliation

10/2/14

If You can do anything, have compassion on us and help us —Mark 9:22

After every time of exaltation, we are brought down with a sudden rush into things as they really are, where it is neither beautiful, poetic, nor thrilling. The height of the mountaintop is measured by the dismal drudgery of the valley, but it is in the valley that we have to live for the glory of God. We see His glory on the mountain, but we never live for His glory there. It is in the place of humiliation that we find our true worth to God— that is where our faithfulness is revealed. Most of us can do things if we are always at some heroic level of intensity, simply because of the natural selfishness of our own hearts. But God wants us to be at the drab everyday level, where we live in the valley according to our personal relationship with Him. Peter thought it would be a wonderful thing for them to remain on the mountain, but Jesus Christ took the disciples down from the mountain and into the valley, where the true meaning of the vision was explained (see Mark 9:5-6 , Mark 9:14-23).
“If you can do anything . . . .” It takes the valley of humiliation to remove the skepticism from us. Look back at your own experience and you will find that until you learned who Jesus really was, you were a skillful skeptic about His power. When you were on the mountaintop you could believe anything, but what about when you were faced with the facts of the valley? You may be able to give a testimony regarding your sanctification, but what about the thing that is a humiliation to you right now? The last time you were on the mountain with God, you saw that all the power in heaven and on earth belonged to Jesus— will you be skeptical now, simply because you are in the valley of humiliation? 
My Utmost for His Highest - Oswald Chambers
Oswald Chambers (c. 1905)


4 comments:

  1. Next reading for my British Literature class: The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan. I well remember the section called "The Valley of Humiliation."

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Ghost of Soren KierkegaardOctober 3, 2014 at 10:09 AM

    A wise man

    ReplyDelete
  3. She dwells by Great Kenhawa's side,
    In valleys green and cool;
    And all her hope and all her pride
    Are in the village school.

    Her soul, like the transparent air
    That robes the hills above,
    Though not of earth, encircles there
    All things with arms of love.

    And thus she walks among her girls
    With praise and mild rebukes;
    Subduing e'en rude village churls
    By her angelic looks.

    She reads to them at eventide
    Of One who came to save;
    To cast the captive's chains aside
    And liberate the slave.

    And oft the blessed time foretells
    When all men shall be free;
    And musical, as silver bells,
    Their falling chains shall be.

    And following her beloved Lord,
    In decent poverty,
    She makes her life one sweet record
    And deed of charity.

    For she was rich, and gave up all
    To break the iron bands
    Of those who waited in her hall,
    And labored in her lands.

    Long since beyond the Southern Sea
    Their outbound sails have sped,
    While she, in meek humility,
    Now earns her daily bread.

    It is their prayers, which never cease,
    That clothe her with such grace;
    Their blessing is the light of peace
    That shines upon her face.


    Henry Wdsworth Longfellow, "The Good Part that Shall Not be Taken Away"

    ReplyDelete
  4. She dwells by Great Kenhawa's side,
    In valleys green and cool;
    And all her hope and all her pride
    Are in the village school.

    Her soul, like the transparent air
    That robes the hills above,
    Though not of earth, encircles there
    All things with arms of love.

    And thus she walks among her girls
    With praise and mild rebukes;
    Subduing e'en rude village churls
    By her angelic looks.

    She reads to them at eventide
    Of One who came to save;
    To cast the captive's chains aside
    And liberate the slave.

    And oft the blessed time foretells
    When all men shall be free;
    And musical, as silver bells,
    Their falling chains shall be.

    And following her beloved Lord,
    In decent poverty,
    She makes her life one sweet record
    And deed of charity.

    For she was rich, and gave up all
    To break the iron bands
    Of those who waited in her hall,
    And labored in her lands.

    Long since beyond the Southern Sea
    Their outbound sails have sped,
    While she, in meek humility,
    Now earns her daily bread.

    It is their prayers, which never cease,
    That clothe her with such grace;
    Their blessing is the light of peace
    That shines upon her face.


    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "The Good Part, That Which Shall NOT Be Taken Away"

    ReplyDelete

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