Monday, September 3, 2012


As Imperceptibly as Grief

As imperceptibly as Grief
The Summer lapsed away —
Too imperceptible at last
To seem like Perfidy —

A Quietness distilled
As Twilight long begun,
Or Nature spending with herself
Sequestered Afternoon —

The Dusk drew earlier in —
The Morning foreign shone —
A courteous, yet harrowing Grace,
As Guest, that would be gone —

And thus, without a Wing
Or service of a Keel
Our Summer made her light escape
Into the Beautiful. 

~ Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

5 comments:

  1. I wish grief DID imperceptibly lapse away...believe me. I know you feel the same way, FT.

    Your images are perfect; the one above, lovely...the closed umbrella the perfect indication of summer over without screaming it. Nice.

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  2. Grief -- real grief -- is eternal. Mourning lessens, but never disappears.

    We survivors learn to live with both grief and mourning. But life is never as bright as it once was.

    I haven't been really happy for nearly three years now. Those here who know me understand why I'm typing this in.

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  3. Dear, friends,

    There may be no remedy abel to dissolve Grief and make it disappear, but Understanding offers consolation, and one can experience great Beauty in both Acceptance and Understanding. That's why I love Emily Dickinson so much. She and many of the other great poets serve as an understanding friend to many.


    They say that "Time assuages" ––
    Time never did assuage --
    An actual suffering strengthens
    As Sinews do, with age --

    Time is a Test of Trouble --
    But not a Remedy --
    If such it prove, it prove too
    There was no Malady --


    ~ Emily Dickinson


    ~ FT

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  4. Wordsworth -- another understanding friend -- brings comfort and joy -- at least to me.

    Then sing, ye birds, sing, sing a joyous song!
     
            _____ And let the young lambs bound
     
            _____ As to the tabor's sound!
     
    We in thought will join your throng,
     
          _____ Ye that pipe and ye that play,
     
          _____ Ye that through your hearts to-day
     
          _____ Feel the gladness of the May!
     
    What though the radiance which was once so bright
     
    Be now for ever taken from my sight,
     
        _____ Though nothing can bring back the hour
     
    Of splendour in the grass, of glory in the flower;
     
          _____ We will grieve not, rather find
     
          _____ Strength in what remains behind;
     
          _____ In the primal sympathy
     
          _____ Which having been must ever be;
     
          _____ In the soothing thoughts that spring
     
          _____ Out of human suffering;
     
          _____ In the faith that looks through death,
     
    In years that bring the philosophic mind. ...


    Thanks to the human heart by which we live,
     
    Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears,
     
    To me the meanest flower that blows can give
     
    Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.

     
     
    ~ Wordsworth (1770-1850) - Intimations of Immortality


    ~ FT

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