Tuesday, October 1, 2013


SHUT DOWN, GUBMINT

Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, we can’t shut down!
Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, we can’t shut down!
Why don’t you SHUT DOWN? 
No we can’t SHUT DOWN,
‘Cause we got control of congress 
And Barack he wears the crown!

Who's that yonder dressed in red?
Must be the children that Karl Marx led.
Who's that yonder dressed in white?
Must be the Puritans who lost their might.

Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, we can’t shut down!
Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, we can’t shut down!
C’mon and SHUT DOWN? 
No we can’t SHUT DOWN,
‘Cause we got control of congress 
And Barack he wears the crown!

Who's that yonder lookin’ blue?
Must be the the targets that the activists’ll sue
Who's that yonder turnin’ back?
Must be Caucasians who pretend they’re black.

Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, I can’t shut down!
Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN?  
Lawd, I can’t shut down!
Oh won’t you SHUT DOWN? 
No we can’t SHUT DOWN,
‘Cause we we got control of congress 
And Barack he wears the crown!

~ Anne Animus


32 comments:

  1. The House Rules Committee has been in existence since 1789. The first actual government shutdown was in 1976 during the Ford Administration. Over the past 80 years and 64 years that Democrats have controlled the Rules Committee, there have been fifteen government shutdowns. FIFTEEN. In the 16 years the Republicans have controlled it there have been two. TWO.

    So, why are the Republicans being blamed? Yeah, Democrats have very short memories.


    September 30 - October 11, 1976: Citing out of control spending, President Gerald Ford vetoed a funding bill for the United States Department of Labor and the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), leading to a partial government shutdown. On October 1, the Democratic-controlled Congress overrode Ford's veto but it took until October 11 for a continuing resolution ending funding gaps for other parts of government to become law.

    your stupidly..

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  2. Yeah, Democrats have very short memories.
    September 30 - October 11, 1976: Citing out of control spending, President Gerald Ford vetoed a funding bill for the United States Department of Labor and the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), leading to a partial government shutdown. On October 1, the Democratic-controlled Congress overrode Ford's veto but it took until October 11 for a continuing resolution ending funding gaps for other parts of government to become law.
    September 30 - October 13, 1977: The Democratic-controlled House continued to uphold the ban on using Medicaid dollars to pay for abortions, except in cases where the life of the mother was at stake. Meanwhile, the Democratic-controlled Senate pressed to loosen the ban to allow abortion funding in the case of rape or incest. A funding gap was created when disagreement over the issue between the houses had become tied to funding for the Departments of Labor and HEW, leading to a partial government shutdown. A temporary agreement was made to restore funding through October 31, 1977, allowing more time for Congress to resolve its dispute.
    October 31 - November 9 1977: The earlier temporary funding agreement expired. President Jimmy Carter signed a second funding agreement to allow for more time for negotiation.
    November 30 - December 9, 1977: The second temporary funding agreement expired. The House held firm against against the Senate in its effort to ban Medicaid paying for the abortions of victims of statutory rape. A deal was eventually struck which allowed Medicaid to pay for abortions in cases resulting from rape, incest, or in which the mother's health is at risk.
    September 30 - October 18, 1978: Deeming them wasteful, President Carter vetoed a public works appropriations bill and a defense bill including funding for a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Spending for the Department of HEW was also delayed over additional disputes concerning Medicaid funding for abortion.
    September 30 - October 12, 1979: Against the opposition of the Senate, the House pushed for a 5.5 percent pay increase for congress members and senior civil servants. The House also sought to restrict federal spending on abortion only to cases where the mother's life is in danger, while the Senate wanted to maintain funding for abortions in cases of rape and incest.
    November 20 - November 23, 1982: President Ronald Reagan pledged that he would veto any spending bill that failed to include at least half of the $8.4 billion in domestic budget cuts that he proposed. Although the Republican controlled Senate passed a bill that met his specifications, the Democratic House insisted on larger cuts to defense than Reagan wanted and for congressional and civil servant pay raises. A compromise bill fell $2 billion short of the cuts Reagan wanted, so Reagan vetoed the bill and shut down the federal government. A temporary bill restored spending through 15 December and gave Congress the time to work out a more lasting deal.

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  3. September 30 - October 2, 1982: Congress passed the required spending bills a day late.
    December 17 - December 21, 1982: The Democratic controlled House and the Republican controlled Senate wished to fund jobs, but President Reagan vowed to veto any such legislation. The House also opposed plans to fund the MX missile. The shutdown ended after Congress abandoned their jobs plan, but Reagan was forced to yield on funding for both the MX and Pershing II missiles. He also accepted funding for the Legal Services Corporation, which he wanted abolished, in exchange for higher foreign aid to Israel.
    November 10 - November 14, 1983: The Democratic controlled House increased education funding, but cut defense and foreign aid spending, which led to a dispute with President Reagan. Eventually, the House reduced their proposed education funding, and also accepted funding for the MX missile. However, the foreign aid and defense cuts remained, and oil and gas leasing was banned in federal wildlife refuges. Abortion was also prohibited for being paid for with government employee health insurance.
    September 30 - October 3, 1984: The House wished to link the budget to both a crime-fighting package President Reagan supported and a water projects package he did not. The Senate additionally tied the budget to a civil rights measure designed to overturn Grove City v. Bell. Reagan proposed a compromise where he abandoned his crime package in exchange for Congress dropping theirs. A deal was not struck, and a three-day spending extension was passed instead.
    October 3 - October 5, 1984: The three-day spending extension expired, forcing a shutdown. Congress dropped their proposed water and civil rights packages, while President Reagan kept his crime package. Funding for aid to the Nicaraguan Contras was also passed.
    October 16 - October 18, 1986: A dispute over multiple issues between the Democratic controlled House and President Reagan and the Republican Senate forced a shutdown. The Democratic controlled House dropped many of their demands in exchange for a vote on their welfare package, and a concession of the sale of then-government-owned Conrail.
    December 18 - December 20, 1987: Democrats, who now controlled both the House and the Senate, opposed funding for the Contras, and wanted the Federal Communications Commission to begin reenforcing the "Fairness Doctrine". They yielded on the "Fairness Doctrine" in exchange for non-lethal aid to the Contras.

    October 5 - October 9, 1990: President George H.W. Bush vowed to veto any continuing resolution that was not paired with a deficit reduction package, and did so when one reached his desk. The House failed to override his veto before a shutdown occurred. Congress then passed a continuing resolution with a deficit reduction package that Bush signed to end the shutdown.November 13 - November 19, 1995: In the shutdown of 1995 and 1996 President Bill Clinton vetoed a continuing resolution passed by the Republican-controlled Congress. A deal was reached allowing for 75 percent funding for four weeks, and Clinton agreed to a seven-year timetable for a balanced budget.
    December 16 - January 6, 1996: Subsequently the Republicans demanded President Clinton propose a budget with the seven-year timetable using Congressional Budget Office numbers, rather than Clinton's Office of Management and Budget numbers. However, Clinton refused. Eventually, Congress and Clinton agreed to pass a compromise budget.
    Leftwingers, Say something else thats stupid and I will not hesitate to negate your stupidly..

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  4. You sir, are an artist in the medium of words.

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  5. Than you for all that pertinent information, Lib Buster, although I would have preferred it without the sarcasm and name-calling, since that just gives the Other Side ammunition to throw back at us.

    Normally, we reject BOILERPLATE here, but welcome this, since it actually relates to today's [admittedly light-headed] post.

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  6. Bravo, that aimed it all up in some great words, including your ending.

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  7. How does a Caucasian pretend he's black and what does that have to do with the shutdown?

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  8. Pretending to be stupid, so you can ask distracting, utterly irrelevant questions is one of the oldest tricks in the Leftist Playbook.

    Fortunately, I'm immune to such tactics.

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  10. The PRETENSE at being DENSE is quite IMMENSE.
    It's pure NONSENSE for which there's no DEFENSE.

    Though it makes too many TENSE
    I'm delighted a today's turn of EVENTS.

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  11. The images you use are really priceless, FT.

    So glad to see you back in business. Im sure I'm not the only one who has missed your inventive, always stimulating presence.

    Helen Highwater

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  12. The following is a list of things that have been, at various times, demanded by Republicans under threat of a government shutdown or default:


    1. A balanced budget amendment

    2. Approving Keystone XL

    3. Eliminating funding for Planned Parenthood

    4. Medicare privatization

    5. Tax reform, as outlined by Paul Ryan

    6. The REINS Act, which would require Congress to approve significant federal regulations

    7. Means-testing Social Security

    8. Defunding Obamacare

    9. Allowing employers to eliminate insurance coverage for birth control

    10. An expansion of off-shore drilling

    11. Preserving all the Bush tax cuts

    12. "Trillions" in budget cuts

    13. Slashing funding for food stamps

    14. Protecting mountaintop strip mining

    15. Stripping the EPA of authority to regulate greenhouse gases

    16. Loosening regulation on coal ash

    17. Delaying Obamacare implementation by one year

    18. Repealing a tax on medical devices

    19. Eliminating Social Service Block Grants

    20. Expanding drilling on federal lands

    21. Restricting the child tax credit

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  13. corrected:
    "I disagree that Ducky's question is irrelevant. In fact, I can't see how it could be (always assuming the stanza he asked you to clarify was relevant in the first place).

    I wonder which playbook Freethinke is consulting?

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  14. Ducky,

    Everything on that list is worth fighting, sacrificing and possibly even dying for.

    Thank you for providing that information all in one place. I hope I may assume it's been properly vetted?

    In the parallel universe you and your ideological bedfellows inhabit, doubtless you see those demands as great evils, and more fodder for your abundant store of contempt.

    "We" feel differently, however, and "we" believe in doing "our" best to promote, protect and defend, what "we" believe in.

    "You" may disagree with "us" certainly, but you have no right to vilify and mischaracterize "our" motives. The leftist penchant for endlessly demanding "explanations" when they know full well what "we" mean is a deplorable tactic calculated to EXHAUST "us."

    As I never tire of saying, "you" fully intend to achieve victory through attrition -- wearing "us" down to a frazzle with your incessant badgering.

    I refuse to play that game anymore. I'm too fuckin' old to waste what little time I may have left in that fashion.

    When it comes to politics, where I'm concerned you have only two choices: love me or leave me. I might prefer the former, but I'm happy to accept the latter, if needs be.

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  15. For the first time in 13 years America has a balanced federal budget.

    Viva la Shutdown!

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  16. Now, see if you can figure out all on your own why I am posting this poem:

    I NEVER saw a moor,
    I never saw the sea;
    Yet know I how the heather looks,
    And what a wave must be.

    I never spoke with God,
    Nor visited in heaven;
    Yet certain am I of the spot
    As if the chart were given.


    ~ Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

    HINT: It speaks to the question How do we know anything?

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  17. Welcome to the "new normal",ducky!

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  18. How do we know anything?

    We watch it on Faux News!

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  19. I understand Emily Dickinson tolerably well; the intention behind your verse remains elusive. I fear you flatter your powers of self expression, and I must inform you that your post is not so obvious as you hoped

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  20. Must be the Puritans who lost their might.

    -----
    And for that we should all be thankful.

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  21. Perhaps it is you who flatters your own intelligence and powers of perception? Your apparent inability to grasp subtle implications indicates no ineptitude in the art of communication on my part. It was not my intention to be obvious.

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  22. It became apparent back in the day
    in a college poetry course that the subtleties of rhyme and meter
    were beyond my ken. Now limericks,
    they seem straightforward:
    -An accident really uncanny
    Occurred to my elderly granny
    she sat down in a chair
    while her false teeth were there
    and bit herself right in the fanny
    ..even I understand that one!

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  23. I love limericks, myself, BB. I'll add Granny's fanny to my collection. Thanks.

    A longtime favorite, I wish I had made up myself, but didn't:

    Said the maid, as the Bishop withdrew,
    "My dear sir, I'm afraid this won't do,
    "For the Vicar is slicker
    "And thicker and quicker,
    "And longer and stronger than you!"


    Some would call that "dirty," I suppose, but there's not a dirty word in it, and to me it's just funny as hell.

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  24. If what you wrote was obscure, whether by accident or design, then your grounds for supposing Ducky's confusion to be subterfuge have disappeared.

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  25. the actress, with weary detachment,
    made note of the bishop's lewd tangent.
    she couldn't ignore
    it (he'd done it before)
    so she sued him for sexual harrasment.

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  26. This orgy's becoming a bore.
    I don't want to screw anymore.
    I'm covered with sweat,
    And no one's has come yet,
    And, my God! it's a quarter past four!

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  27. Endless argumentation's a bore.
    I won't parry and thrust anymore.
    To seek no conclusion,
    Adds naught but confusion,
    And so I must show you the door!

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  28. A familiar ring to
    "Who's that yonder lookin’ blue?
    Must be the the targets that the activists’ll sue
    Who's that yonder turnin’ back?
    Must be Caucasians who pretend they’re black."
    ..then the music started running though my head. Early sixties:
    Peter, Paul & Mary 'Go Tell it On
    The Mountain'. A rework of an old
    spiritual by John Wesley Work from
    Civil War times. The song went on,
    Simon & Garfunkle, Frank Sinatra,
    even Dolly Parton...and the repetition sank in. Coming back to the surface when I read those
    words and started humming.
    How many times must a song be heard, before it will stick in my
    head? The answer my friend....

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  29. A take off, BB, on the famous Negro Spiritual, Sit Down, Sister. I learnt that in elementary school. It's a fun, high spirited, innocent, childlike thing that makes you want to clap as you sing it.

    As you may or may not know, I'm a professionally rained musician -- among other things --, and the constant repetition of SHUTDOWN! over and over in the media suggested this silly parody to me.

    Without humor life would be impossible.

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  30. Don't want thrusts, parties, and sure as hell don't want to screw you. Honest dialog is all you get out of me (whether you recognise it or not).

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  31. As said earlier, life without humor is to me untenable.

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